apap065
New York State Modern Political Archive
Collection ID: apap065

Capital Area School Development Association (CASDA) Records, 1949-1991

Collection description

Summary

Creator:
Capital Area School Development Association
Abstract:
CASDA is cooperative organization among public and private schools and the University at Albany's School of Education to facilitate programs for school employees.
Extent:
5 cubic ft.
Language:
English and English
Preferred citation:
Preferred citation for this material is as follows: and Identification of specific item, series, box, folder, Capital Area School Development Association (CASDA) Records, 1949-1991. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University at Albany, State University of New York (hereafter referred to as [shortened name]).

Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access:

Access to this record group is unrestricted.

Terms Of Use:

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of copyright. Whenever possible, the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives will provide information about copyright owners and other restrictions, but the legal determination ultimately rests with the researcher. Requests for permission to publish material from this collection should be discussed with the Head of Special Collections and Archives.

Background

Scope and Content:

The collection documents the history of the association's management, activities, and programs from 1949 to 1991. Records include administrative papers, meeting minutes, and operations files of CASDA, published reports and newsletters, and conference programs and materials. The bulk of the collection contains publications and published reports from 1950 to 1970. The collection includes administrative records, publications, and reports of CASDA. Materials were kept by Edwin P. Adkins, Ph.D., who served from 1953-1963 as chairman of education at the New York State College for Teachers, which is now the University at Albany's School of Education.

Included in the administrative files series are minutes, programs, and materials from the annual CASDA meeting, minutes and memos from the administrative and executive committee conferences, and materials from general and regional meetings. The administrative papers also contain a history of the association, constitution and by-laws, financial records (1950-1969) and annual reports (1955-1960). This series contains annual calendars of CASDA events (1951-1962). There are letters, memos, and bulletins from the executive director (1960-1979). The administrative files contain documents related to studies and surveys conducted by CASDA's study council. Council minutes, research materials, and documents include examinations on teacher salaries, health insurance and benefits, public school opinion polls, and teacher promotion policies. There are also materials on special studies such as the Citizens Action Program (1953-1955). Publications include Casdaids, the association's newsletter (1949-1986) and the one-page leaflet, CASDAGram (1961, 1971-1988).

The bulk of the administrative files have documents related to seminars and conferences organized by CASDA from 1950 to 1965. Seminar materials related to curriculum and teacher development include topics such as elementary, junior high, high school, higher education, and adult education. There are materials for gifted and exceptional children, language arts, library education, moral and spiritual education, mental health, and disabled students. There are several documents relating to the professional development of non-teacher school staff . These include materials on the annual custodial and secretaries conferences. There are documents on school business management, and materials from school board clinics (1953-1973) and school law conferences (1953-1991).

There are three cubic feet of reports which date from 1950 to 1986, with most from 1950 to 1965. The bulk of the reports and publications address issues related to school administration and management, such as salary studies, teacher improvement, school law, student dropouts, school policy, and information for school board members. There are numerous CASDA survey reports. There also are reports and booklets for teachers on topics such as reading, economics, independent learning, and language arts. There are also booklets for non-teacher school staff such as handbooks for custodians and secretaries.

Biographical / Historical:

The Capital Area School Development Association (CASDA) is a cooperative organization among public and private schools and the University at Albany's School of Education. Through programming, CASDA provides professional development for administrators, teachers, and school support staff. It is a voluntary self-governed association managed by an executive committee and chief school administrators. Its purpose is to facilitate programs for school employees. Finance is acquired through membership and the University.

CASDA was first suggested by a group of Schoharie County principals and school officials. Representatives from Schoharie and other schools met periodically in Albany, New York with faculty at the New York State College for Teachers to discuss changes in education and school affairs. The group aimed to network the college with public school teachers and administrators to introduce new philosophies, curriculum, and ideas. The group first convened as CASDA on October 6, 1949, and formed a study council to examine educational needs. Frank W. Frederick, Ph.D., chose the name of the organization, and a ten-member executive committee was formed to manage the association's operations at Milne Hall on the college's campus. CASDA organized during a period when education and the school experience was rapidly changing as a result of post-war expansion. Teachers wanted more development and professional services, and administrators felt a need for research and field services. The college provided these services to village, rural and city school personnel. CASDA's main purpose at the time of its inception was to create a link between K-12 teachers and the college to advance all aspects of education. The State Teacher's Colleges at Albany and Oneonta provided professional seminars. During its first few years of operation, CASDA mostly provided in-service programs for its members or to employees of schools who paid an annual fee to the association. Some of the first programs included television and radio workshops (1954-1957). In 1949, eighteen school districts had joined and CASDA's budget was $2,000. By 1950, thirty-seven schools had joined and by 1968 fifty had joined. Membership cost $.10 per pupil per school and the budget was $33,400. By 1970, BOCES schools became CASDA members. Seventy-three schools from eleven counties belonged to CASDA by 1986.

The executive committee consisted of administrators from the State Teachers College and local school administrators. Between four and twelve staff members and researchers also served CASDA before the 1980s. The first executive director was Joe Leese, 1949-1952. Other executive directors include Don Denley, 1953-1967; Bernard Bryan, 1967-1970; Al Farnsworth, 1970-1976; and Greg Benson, who took office in 1976. CASDA received federal funding for "Project B" in 1964 to study education in the region. In 1967, CASDA moved to the New York State Education Building in Albany, and in 1971 the association was chartered by the State Education Department. CASDA continued to organize conferences and seminars, and continued to form study councils. The council researched salaries, employee insurance issues, school budgets, and the economics of building construction. New programs included computer education and library media seminars. CASDA held annual administrative meetings, and annual conferences for first-year teachers, executive secretaries and custodians.

In 1986, the CASDA board consisted of ten members. Four staff members ran day-to-day operations with graduate assistants to support staff. In 1991, CASDA studied the problems of area schools and served 125 school districts with continuing education seminars. CASDA organized conferences for educators, school board members, and administrative staff. In 2006, Gregory Aidala was executive director, and CASDA was considered the third largest educational association in the United States. It is located on the East Campus of the University at Albany, in Rensselaer, New York, and is a study council of the University at Albany's School of Education.

Acquisition information:

The items in this manuscript group were transferred to the University Libraries, M. E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, from the University Library's Education Bibliographer, via the Curriculum Library, by Susan Smith, Ph.D., in the spring of 1972.

Processing information:

Processed in 1973-2006 by Tricia Barbagallo (February 2006), Box and Folder List Assistance by Kayla Misner.

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Restrictions:
Access to this record group is unrestricted.
Terms of Access:
The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of copyright. Whenever possible, the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives will provide information about copyright owners and other restrictions, but the legal determination ultimately rests with the researcher. Requests for permission to publish material from this collection should be discussed with the Head of Special Collections and Archives.
Preferred citation:
Preferred citation for this material is as follows: and Identification of specific item, series, box, folder, Capital Area School Development Association (CASDA) Records, 1949-1991. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University at Albany, State University of New York (hereafter referred to as [shortened name]).