ua605.001
University Archives
Collection ID: ua605.001

Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literature Records

Collection description

Summary

Creator:
Students of the Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literature
Abstract:
Contains departmental copies of German dissertations submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Extent:
3.0 cubic ft.
Language:
German and German English
Preferred citation:
Preferred citation for this material is as follows: and Identification of specific item, series, box, folder, Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literature Records, 1970-1984. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University at Albany, State University of New York (hereafter referred to as the Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literature Records).

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Conditions Governing Access:

Access to this record group is unrestricted.

Terms Of Use:

This page may contain links to digital objects. Access to these images and the technical capacity to download them does not imply permission for re-use. Digital objects may be used freely for personal reference use, referred to, or linked to from other web sites.

Researchers do not have permission to publish or disseminate material from these collections without permission from an archivist and/or the copyright holder.

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of copyright. Some materials in these collections may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) and/or by the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations. More information about U.S. Copyright is provided by the Copyright Office. Additionally, re-use may be restricted by terms of University Libraries gift or purchase agreements, donor restrictions, privacy and publicity rights, licensing and trademarks.

The Department of Special Collections and Archives is eager to hear from any copyright owners who are not properly identified so that appropriate information may be provided in the future.

Background

Scope and Content:

Contains departmental copies of German dissertations submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Biographical / Historical:

The New York State Normal College first introduced a course in the "methods of teaching...Greek, French or German" to students in the Classical Course in 1890. [Circular of the New York State Normal College, Albany, N.Y., for 1890 and 1891, p. 10]. In 1890 the renamed College was given the mission of training high school teachers in New York. As foreign languages were not taught in the Common Schools, no instruction in German was offered by the State Normal School. Students taking the Classical Course were required to have two years of German before attending the Normal College, presumably eliminating the need to teach the subject. [Ibid., p. 8] By 1904 a course in the "Literature of the German Language" had been added to the methods course. [Circular and Announcement of the Courses of Instruction, 1904, p. 29]. The revised mission of the College adopted by the Regents on December 14, 1905, effective September 1906, which changed the school into a four year liberal arts college for teachers, schooldesignation the school adopted a four year liberal arts curriculum. German was taught in the Department of until 1964 when the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures was created.[1] Courses included German language and literature.[2] Two programs were offered: A Teacher Education Program and a General Program both leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), totaling twenty-seven hours.[3] The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures also offered instruction in Russian, Polish, and Chinese. The department endeavored "to expand the student's intellectual horizon to embrace a culture other than his own. The foreign language is at once part of that culture and the only medium through which an intimate sense of the total culture may be gained. Extra-curricular opportunities to practice the foreign language in an informal setting are offered by language clubs and language tables."[4] In 1967 the department expanded its program by offering a year long study abroad program at the University of Wurzburg in Germany. A Masters program was established in 1968 to provide sufficient depth to prepare the student for a career in teaching at the secondary level of for further graduate study.[7]

In 1970, the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures was established.[5] The Department offered three programs leading to the B.A. Degree: A Teachers Education Program, a General Program, and an Honors Program which began in 1969.[6] The departments offerings were expanded in 1972 to include a Ph.D. in German.**8 The department offered a year abroad of instruction in Chinese at Nayand University in Singapore until a department of Chinese Studies was established in 197?.

The Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures merged with the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1996. German language instruction was eliminated on campus in 1997 with German language instruction now offered through an agreement with Union College. The Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies was created in 1998.

Chairs of Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1964-1970 1964- George W. Kreye, Chairman 1966 Charles W. Coleman, Acting Chair 1967-1970 John Winkleman, Chairman 1970 John Spalek, Chairman Department of Slavic Studies, 1970-1994 1970 or 1971(?)-1977 Alex M. Shane, Chairman 1977-1978 Rodney L. Patterson, Acting Chairman 1978-1980 Alex M. Shane, Chair 1980-1985 Ernest Scatton, Chair 1985-1988 Henryk Baran, Chair (?) 1988-1989 Robinson Harlow, Chair 989-1992 Henryk Baran, Chair 1992-1994 Robinson Harlow, Chair Chairs of Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literatures, 1994-1997 1994-1995 Harlow Robinson, Chair 1995-1997 Charles Rougle, Chair

Acquisition information:

All items in this manuscript group were donated to the University Libraries, M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives.

Processing information:

Processed in 2015 by Jason Lenkowitz.

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Restrictions:
Access to this record group is unrestricted.
Terms of Access:
This page may contain links to digital objects. Access to these images and the technical capacity to download them does not imply permission for re-use. Digital objects may be used freely for personal reference use, referred to, or linked to from other web sites. , Researchers do not have permission to publish or disseminate material from these collections without permission from an archivist and/or the copyright holder., The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of copyright. Some materials in these collections may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) and/or by the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations. More information about U.S. Copyright is provided by the Copyright Office. Additionally, re-use may be restricted by terms of University Libraries gift or purchase agreements, donor restrictions, privacy and publicity rights, licensing and trademarks. , and The Department of Special Collections and Archives is eager to hear from any copyright owners who are not properly identified so that appropriate information may be provided in the future.
Preferred citation:
Preferred citation for this material is as follows: and Identification of specific item, series, box, folder, Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literature Records, 1970-1984. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University at Albany, State University of New York (hereafter referred to as the Department of Slavic and Germanic Languages and Literature Records).