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Frank C. Moore Papers

Mark Wolfe - November 25, 2009

The Department of Special Collections announces the completion of the online finding aid for the Frank Moore Papers. New York State Governor Thomas E. Dewey signs the 1950 Thruway Authority Act creating the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA), an independent public corporation, which would build and manage the turnpike. (Moore is second from the right). Frank Moore, a New York State politician and civil servant, held a wide range of elected and appointed positions during his fifty-year career. The collection consists primarily of the records of Moore's service in various elected and appointed positions. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, draft and final reports, research material, periodicals, photographs, meeting minutes and news clippings. Many series contain extensive files of internal research and reports that document the statistical information which guided the decision-making of Moore and his colleagues during Moore’s long career as a public servant. After his admission to the bar...

John H. E. Fried Papers

Mark Wolfe - April 17, 2009

The Department of Special Collections announces the completion of the John H. E. Fried Papers online finding aid, part of the German and Jewish Intellectual Émigré Collections. Fried, a lawyer, professor and human rights activist, came to the United States in 1938 from Vienna, Austria shortly after its annexation by Hitler. Upon his arrival in New York in the summer of 1938, Fried joined the Institute for Social Research of Columbia University and wrote three highly acclaimed books (The Guilt of the German Army, 1942; The Significance of Democracy: Constitutional Developments and Labor Relations in Austria, 1944; and The Exploitation of Foreign Labor by Germany, 1945). In January of 1947, the U.S. War Department requested Fried's services for a three-month survey of certain aspects of the law of war, and to serve as Consultant to the U.S. Secretary of War, assigned to the U.S. War Crimes Tribunals in Nuremberg, Germany....

Student Newspaper Available Online From 1916-1985

Mark Wolfe - April 10, 2009

The M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives is pleased to announce the online availability of the University at Albany’s student newspaper from 1916-1985. You can browse each issue from the State College News, 1916-1963, State University News, 1963-1964, and the Albany Student Press (ASP), 1964-1985. The ASP , 1986 - 2009, and The Echo, 1892-1916, are available in hard copy at the Special Collections' Marcia Brown Reading Room. Issues are available at: http://library.albany.edu/speccoll/findaids/studentnewspapers.htm Support for this digital project came from the Friends of the Libraries and would not have been possible without their assistance. In collaboration with the Library Systems Department, we are developing a full text database of the newspaper that will allow searching across multiple issues, years, or decades. In addition, the Department of Special Collections will develop a plan to digitize the ASP,1986 -2009, and The Echo, 1892-1916, a student news and literary magazine.

Harvey Milk's First Newspaper Column

Mark Wolfe - April 10, 2009

From the State College News, February 23, 1951

"Stress of academic work nothing new" selections from the University Archives

Mark Wolfe - November 19, 2008

While writing those end of semester papers and preparing for finals current students might find some truth in Carrie J. Goddard's 1894 notes on Professor James Wetmore's class in Sanitary Science at the New York State Normal College (reproduced below). The title of the lecture, or at least of Goddard's notes on the lecture, was "Dangers of School Life to the Brain." According to Goddard's notes below, Wetmore told the class that "impure air, over study, examinations, punishments" could lead to diseases of the brain such as "St. Vitas' Dance, epilepsy, brain fever, [or] nervous prostration," or simply to "insanity." Pictured below is Professor Wetmore with his Natural Science Class in our Willett Street Building, ca. 1890. No picture of Goddard exists. For the original 1894 notebook and photos of our school, at the time the State Normal College, in the 1890 consult the University Archivist Geoffrey Williams in the...

Historical Children's Literature Exhibit

Mark Wolfe - November 05, 2008

This exhibition, originally mounted in conjunction with the publication of Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs, and the Shaping of American Children’s Literature by Leonard Marcus, will remain on display here in the M.E. Grenander Special Collections Department through Friday January 16th, 2009.

Paul Leser Papers

Mark Wolfe - September 22, 2008

The Department of Special Collections announces the completion of the finding aid for the Paul Leser Papers. Leser held positions at the Frankfurter Bund für Volksbildung and at the Ethnological Museum in Frankfurt, Germany before becoming a Privatdozent for Ethnology at the Darmstadt Institute of Technology. During this time period he became involved in the case against Dr. Julius Lips of the Raustenstrauch-Joest Museum, who was accused by Leser and others of plagiarizing from the works of Graebner, Schmidt, and Koppers. The case dragged on until 1933, when many of the participants were removed from their positions by the Nazis. Though the case took up much of his time in the early 1930's, his main interest was his own work on the history of the plow. In 1931, his most renowned work Entstehunq und Verbreitung des Pfluges was published (it was eventually reprinted in Denmark in 1971). In 1936, because...

Hugo Bedau Papers

Mark Wolfe - September 10, 2008

The Department of Special Collections announces the completion of the finding aid for the Hugo A. Bedau Papers which are part of the National Death Penalty Archive. Bedau is a commentator, scholar, and activist for the abolition of capital punishment. This collection reflects Bedau’s commitment as an activist who has challenged the fundamental legality of the death penalty and as a prominent spokesperson known for his scholarship and writing concerning the death penalty. In 1966, Bedau was hired as Professor of Philosophy at Tufts University where spent the next thirty-three years as he helped found the Center for the Study of Decision Making. Among his other scholarly work, Bedau is the author of: The Death Penalty in America: An Anthology (1962), that is currently in its 4th edition; co-editor, Capital Punishment in the United States (1976); Courts, the Constitution and Capital Punishment (1977); Death is Different (1987); editor, Civil Disobedience...

Leonard S. Marcus

Mark Wolfe - July 31, 2008

Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs, and the Shaping of American Children' Literature Where: Standish Room, Third floor Science Library, University at Albany, SUNY When: October 23, 2008, 4:00 PM Leonard Marcus, one of the foremost authorities on the history of children' literature, will discuss and sign his new book, Minders of Make-Believe (2008, Houghton Mifflin), an animated first-time history of the visionary editors, authors, librarians, booksellers, and others whose passion for books has transformed American childhood and American culture. What should children read? Marcus tackles this three-hundred-year-old question that sparked the creation of a rambunctious children' book publishing scene in Colonial times. And it' the urgent issue that went on to fuel the transformation of twentieth-century children' book publishing from a genteel backwater to big business. Marcus delivers a provocative look at the fierce turf wars fought among pioneering editors, progressive educators, and librarians - most of them women -...

Leonard S. Marcus

Mark Wolfe - July 31, 2008

Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs, and the Shaping of American Children’s Literature Where: Standish Room, Third floor Science Library, University at Albany, SUNY When: October 23, 2008, 4:00 PM Leonard Marcus, one of the foremost authorities on the history of children’s literature, will discuss and sign his new book, Minders of Make-Believe (2008, Houghton Mifflin), an animated first-time history of the visionary editors, authors, librarians, booksellers, and others whose passion for books has transformed American childhood and American culture. </img> What should children read? Marcus tackles this three-hundred-year-old question that sparked the creation of a rambunctious children’s book publishing scene in Colonial times. And it’s the urgent issue that went on to fuel the transformation of twentieth-century children’s book publishing from a genteel backwater to big business. Marcus delivers a provocative look at the fierce turf wars fought among pioneering editors, progressive educators, and librarians - most of them women...